I like “clingy” people.

I love it when people are affectionate with me. I like when they always invite me places, or text me, or call me. I would rather have that person than someone who makes me text them first all the time and replies back like 10 hours later.

(Source: yeezuschristler, via manikmargo)

astronomy-to-zoology:

Varied Sittella (Daphoenositta chrysoptera)

Also known as the “Australian Nuthatch”, Orange-winged Sitella or Barkpecker the varied sitella is a small species of Sitella (Neosittidae) a family of passerine birds that resemble nuthatches that are endemic to Australasia. Varied sitellas are native to Australia and New Guinea and typically inhabit forested areas. Like nuthatches varied sitellas forage in trees, descending downwards, for insects and seeds.

True to its common name D. chrysoptera's appearance can be quite varied, and usually changes with range. Causing it to have many names/appearances in different locations.

Classification

Animalia-Chordata-Aves-Passeriformes-Neotsittidae-Daphoenositta-D. chrysoptera

Image(s): Aviceda

i-am-charlotte-sometimes:

i-am-charlotte-sometimes:

Mugshot.

I miss this hair
laurensilkhotwife:


"I know it’s something she needs, so I give her permission to have it."

laurensilkhotwife:

"I know it’s something she needs, so I give her permission to have it."

(Source: summerblushes, via sxywomen)

we-want-porn:

-Jay

(Source: fapngo)

sagansense:

Earth’s upper atmosphere—below freezing, nearly without oxygen, flooded by UV radiation—is no place to live. But last winter, scientists from the Georgia Institute of Technology discovered that billions of bacteria actually thrive up there.

Expecting only a smattering of microorganisms, the researchers flew six miles above Earth’s surface in a NASA jet plane. There, they pumped outside air through a filter to collect particles.

Back on the ground, they tallied the organisms, and the count was staggering: 20 percent of what they had assumed to be just dust or other particles was alive. Earth, it seems, is surrounded by a bubble of bacteria.
Now what? Read the whole story over at PopSci…

sagansense:

Earth’s upper atmosphere—below freezing, nearly without oxygen, flooded by UV radiation—is no place to live. But last winter, scientists from the Georgia Institute of Technology discovered that billions of bacteria actually thrive up there.

image

Expecting only a smattering of microorganisms, the researchers flew six miles above Earth’s surface in a NASA jet plane. There, they pumped outside air through a filter to collect particles.

image

Back on the ground, they tallied the organisms, and the count was staggering: 20 percent of what they had assumed to be just dust or other particles was alive. Earth, it seems, is surrounded by a bubble of bacteria.

imageNow what? Read the whole story over at PopSci

(via monsterface)